Monday, December 5, 2011

The Metaphor of the Octopus Worker

Being from the United States where work is mostly about money and where organized labor is frequently demonized, when traveling it's quite refreshing to encounter museums devoted to workers. One such museum is Copenhagen's Arbejdermuseet (Workers' Museum). Among the many stimulating items is a plate from the early 1970s depicting a woman who needs eight arms to juggle all of her responsibilities--taking care of her family, tending to her house and household chores, and working outside the home, all with a smile. In the Workers' Museum, this is described as an octopus woman. I was able to find out that this provocative image was used by the Kvindeligt Arbejderforbund (Female Workers Confederation) as part of their fight for equal pay in Denmark in the early 1970s, but it speaks to me today on many levels.


Of course there is the important level of the continuing need to fully respect work done in the home as just that--work. Unpaid care work is work that can be hard, but also rewarding; work that contributes to our families, communities, and economies, and that should be valued because of these contributions, rather than devalued because it does not directly earn a paycheck.

On another level, this image can also be a metaphor for work more generally. What is work? Too often work is looked at as only one thing, specifically as just a way to earn a living. This is not only unduly narrow, it is destructive. Seeing work only in this way means that job quality is reduced to the dollars and cents on a paycheck, and the bidding down of wages and benefits in a global economy is seen as a natural course of events than cannot be checked. When work is thought of as only about money, it creates a culture where it is necessary and acceptable to closely monitor, supervise, and incentivize employees. This is captured by another object in the Workers' Museum--a clipboard with a built-in stopwatch used by managers to break work down into simple, repetitive, mindless tasks.

In my recent book, The Thought of Work (Cornell University Press, 2011), I try to fight the "one best way" approach to thinking about work that frequently dominates not only public and private policies on work, but also scholarly research. While we need to guard against work becoming all-consuming--the octopus woman image also demonstrates how easy it is to become overburdened by work--I try to embrace the metaphor of the octopus woman by recognizing and valuing work as many things. When we work, we do more than earn a living, we also create, care for, and serve others. We hopefully derive some satisfaction, but also a deeper understanding of our own identities. It is time for researchers to do a better job talking with each other across disciplinary lines, and more importantly, it is time for social norms as well as private and public policies on work to truly embrace work's fundamental importance.

Note: I initially published this entry on the No Way to Make a Living blog, September 2011.

196 comments:

  1. Thanks for this article. He allowed me to resolve some questions about the causes of why the work cannot be reduced to monetary aspect.

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    1. Thanks for this article. Indeed, it is time for social norms as well as private and public policies on work to truly embrace work's fundamental importance i this 21st century.
      I very muchagree with you that "Too often work is looked at as only one thing, specifically as just a way to earn a living". When work is thought of as only about money, it creates a culture where it is necessary and acceptable to demean human dignity This is destructive.
      I totally support the fact that: "There is the important need to fully respect work done in the home as just that--work. Unpaid care work is work that can be hard, but also rewarding; work that contributes to our families, communities, and economies, and that should be valued because of these contributions, rather than devalued because it does not directly earn a paycheck".

      What is work?
      When we work, we do more than earn a living, we also create, care for, and serve others. We hopefully derive some satisfaction, but also a deeper understanding of our own identities.
      Henceforth I uphold that:
      Through my work I serve others because
      it's rooted in my culture, religious belief, and opportunity to express humanitarian concerns.
      In so doing, I join to build strong, vibrant community of believers and the larger Society
      To achieve political or economic goals.
      Of cause, wealth created through my work don’t give me a lasting value or fulfillments

      But I get fulfillment from seeing other people helped, my human capital improved,
      social network extended and civic skills enhanced.

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    2. My perspective on the metaphor of the Octopus woman is that it indicates the multitasking capability of a woman and the second image indicates how monotonous work can be when it is solely attributed to the monetary aspect.

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    3. The octopus women picture really a very heart touching pictures for women mainly for the house wife's the artist who went deeper understanding of the women's mindset and she has gone through to her daily routine

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    4. I always used to consider my self and all women as an octopus, so thank you for this article. This image is so realistic. Many people cannot understand how difficult our role is. Domestic household, working and caring, is very important bus so difficult and time taking sometimes. Many days of my life, i wished i was an octopus, i wished i had 8 hands so that i could manage everything at the same time.

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    5. This article is very interesting.work is not a way to eran income and money.we must take care and serve others

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  2. I'm so happy that you mentioned the housewife as a unpaid worker because I am one of these women and I hope that someday we may get the chance to be highlighted from the society and the governments as you did.

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    1. I just love this piece. It can give hope to all of the women out there who are working tirelessly in so many different facets of their lives without getting any remuneration. Our work, as women, should be valued more!

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    2. The article is indeed relevant. I agree that it is time for social norms as well as private and public policies on work to truly embrace work's fundamental importance.
      Work certainly is not just a way to earn a living or only about money; where and when it does, it becomes unduly narrow, it is destructive and as a natural course of events that cannot be checked.
      families and the larger Society, I appreciate the thought that: "There is the important need to fully respect work done in the home as just that--work. Unpaid care work is work that can be hard, but also rewarding; work that contributes to our families, communities, and economies, and that should be valued because of these contributions, rather than devalued because it does not directly earn a paycheck."

      From the foregoing, I've learnt that When we work, we do more than earn a living, we also create, care for, and serve others. We hopefully derive some satisfaction, but also a deeper understanding of our own identities.
      Than you indeed.

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    3. Thank you for this article
      It's very important

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  3. i appreciate the article because it shows that housewives are great workers whose work is usually overlooked and not considered work.

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  4. i appreciate the article because it shows that housewives are great workers whose work is usually overlooked and not considered work.

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  5. Thanks for this article. He allowed me to resolve some questions about the causes of why the work cannot be reduced to monetary aspect.

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  6. There is some similarity of the picture with Goddess Durga in Hinduism where the women form is seen as all powerful. Still women here are expected to do much more work than men, even if they are in a white collar job. We really need to recognize and appreciate the unpaid work they do in care giving.

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  7. I appreciate this article. It is still interesting to me that women and work is still in the dark ages. Unpaid work needs to be appreciated the same as paid work especially when women in many cultures are expected to stay home to care for the children and household.

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  8. This article highlights along with many reasons why we work, the way women are treated in the society. Despite their ability to multitask their credibility is questioned when they take a career break and decide to join the workforce again. Thanks for this wonderful article which will surely encourage people to think from a caregiver's perspective as well.

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  9. This article highlights some fundamental truths about women's roles which are often overlooked, particularly , at homes. Unpaid work should really be recognized somehow , particularly , where women are concerned.As a HR Manager , I am now challenged to appreciate women at homes who ensure their husbands are properly fed and cared for to continue working for us.Thank you for this article.

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  10. Very heart touching. It is the women, who can bear and confront all these. Doing so much work all around with selflessness need appreciation of each and everyone from the bottom of our heart. Women are the nice gift of God having lot of strength in themselves. Her dedications and love for work whether paid or unpaid, whether household or outside at workplace can not be measured with any kind out weight. It is something beyond Extrinsic or Intrinsic motivation.

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  11. Very true, I think in a way we the human have learned about survival skills first and that could be why we put too much value on work for pay, and disregard the unpaid work that contributes insmensly to our society, specially the work of wives and mothers, without them there would be not be a working social system. Women's household work is divine.

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  12. I liked the article, but what really stood out was the image of the octopus woman and notice it shows her having to scratch the chin of a man? With todays society I think it holds true today in many cases but with less frequency than back in the 70's.

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    1. Very true, in today's world household work are yet not seeing as work which is why some does not appreciate the works that wives do at home.

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  13. This article captures my fancy. I agree that the women in our society are extraordinary people - putting in the much effort they do into their daily work and can still afford to smile. It would be the right thing for unpaid housework to be rewarded and not be devalued. It is work anyway you look at it. It is energy consuming and result achieving. Its time women's work in work places are valued as much as men's are.
    Secondly like you rightly said in the article, 'seeing work as just a way to earn a living or when work is thought of as only about money is destructive' indeed. If this was the case, worker's self esteem would be undermined and without social integration, and no one will enjoy working. If all eyes were on the reward of wages, would endure harsh treatment and disregard; while also disregarding how one treats other colleagues. Then people would be overworked, stressed and work would not be enjoyed.

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  14. Its a new thinking to me to consider work in its various meanings but more importantly that reducing work to commensurate pay isn't doing justice to the broad concept of what work is and should be looked at.

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  15. I appreciate this article where you respect the woman who stay at home for the kids and better living of the family. In many culture this has been devalued where woman staying at home has been called as housewives and not consider as respectable. On the contrary woman's going out for work are consider as successful. Being a woman, I have great respect towards the woman who work and at the same time manage the family but, those woman's who leaves there professional life for the family deserves same respect.

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  16. Beautiful piece Prof, yes working solely for money could be disastrous no matter the nature of the job. Some level of individual desire to sacrifice for the common good of others is very important. The work women do at home ideally is unquantifiable, so I doubt if it can actually get a fair pay. I think the best satisfaction is seeing the fruit of their labor in the success of their children, and seeing that the home is welcoming.

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  17. I really like this article, where women's housework is being looked at as a valuable work. A caring work and a Labor of Love, etc. In many cultures, both housework and caring jobs which dominantly women occupy are looked down upon and very under-valued, not well paid. Because of gender inequality, women are stratified into these jobs, which like the Prof said is not really a biological role. I advocate that women who do home work of taking care of the family should be adequately valued and compensated as well as the other occupations classified as men's domain. Even the professional women are also condemned. Infact I am happy someone is advocating for better treatment of women working at home as care givers and those also those working in the offices. Furthermore, gender discrimination of all manners should be totally eradicated in society. Thank you Professor.

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  19. ''It is time for researchers to do a better job talking with each other across disciplinary lines, and more importantly, it is time for social norms as well as private and public policies on work to truly embrace work's fundamental importance.'' Thank you Professor!

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  20. I agree each individual needs to feel fulfilled in different levels. Money for decent living is important but for us to be happy and fulfilled we need to feel our creative talent to be recognised we care and take care of our own families and also our community and society at large..

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  21. This is a good awareness raiser, one that I'll plan to share with those I have the pleasure of working for.

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  22. I really appreciated how this article not only brought out the importance of what women do in the home, but also how some women multitask work at home, the work for the family, and the job, etc. it really could go on and on. Thank you for recognizing it.

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  23. very insightful article. Being a woman, I still feel that our modern and western society still needs to appreciate more women that have to stay at home to look after the children. Most of the times, their 'work' is underestimated, as they not have a salary and they are still contributing to their society... Indeed, some are like an octopus, being able too multi task, but is the remuneration that needs to be put in place to equally be appreciated. No doubt this is a very sensitive and complex matter.

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  24. yeah after all expenses have been paid we split the rest equally

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  25. Great article, very well explained and expressed. I also believe that one should prioritize and don't be hard to prove, which may lead to exhaustion or low quality work.
    Example of octopus is very impressive.

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  26. Octopus woman speaks to the female perspective in our society in U.S. as females with families must try to reach a balance between work, family, career, and even pursue higher education.

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  27. Thanks for this article. it allows us to make an analysis of our daily life as collaborators of a company, to recognize the value that it gives to our work as a good for others.

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  28. Thank you. It is a very useful article to think about non profitable working.

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  29. The octopus woman is a great concept - the need to manage many things. Men begin to share tasks at home/parenting and gradually develop additional arms, but there is a long way to go. The fight for equal pay for equal work is very much on the agenda.
    In a world where many jobs will be automated, a rational economic perspective will see men (higher paid) losing their jobs much faster than women, and women being selected ahead of men if they do the same work for less.
    Some movies like "The Full Monty" (1997) illustrate how men suffer when they can't find work. (closure of coal mines in Northern England) Men will need to become more octopus like and develop a new sense of worth.

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  30. Awesome excerpt. Having the right work life balance and autonomy at work is key. Sometimes, employers forget our work family consumes the majority of our day. Because of this, we have to remember that no job should be mundane.

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    1. The process of societal developememt must be balance , as we grapple with industrialisation.

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  31. Thanks a mill professor for the wonderful article

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  32. Thank you for this article and it will be useful to me.
    insha Allaah

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  33. This is so good! I'm really inspired by it. Thank you!

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  34. housework is very important although it is unpaid but without it community will not continue. this octopus woman image is very effective.

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  35. thanks for your article professor really it useful

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  36. thanks you for your article it is useful

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  37. I appreciate this piece, now i understand somethings better.

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  38. Thanks for the article. It provides new meaning to the value of work

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  39. great article where it breaks the idea of work only for money

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  40. Thanks for the article, nice thought, hope everyone understand how difficult housewife jobs without pay.

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  41. The octopus woman is such a powerful image. And although it does place a positive, honorable emphasis on the ability to balance so many tasks and to get things done...behind the scenes, as mentioned above, is the hard work that it takes and the burden that it can all sometimes place.

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  42. I find that sometimes, it's the most rewarding work that's done for free...

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  43. Thanks this information and article very true it help me understand important of salary

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  44. I think that women contribute to the success of society and they have more responsibilities than men not only work outside the home and inside the home and take care of children

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  45. I believe that work comes in all forms. I also think about what you stated in your course about opportunity cost. Working just to be able to complete leisure or personal activities. I think that some would argue that while being at home and performing domestic duties or having children, those are still personal decisions and interests.

    Also, when I see the woman on the plate, I think of the Hindu goddess Lakshmi, who has eight arms and represents prosperity and fortune. It is, however; interesting that women are expected to balance domestic tasks, personal interests and work yet are unrecognized for the success despite the challenges or personal decisions they have.

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  46. Indeed another insight unlocked by this good deliverables. Thank you, sir!

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  47. Very interesting article.I totally agree with the idea of that work is not just about earning money.

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  48. I find this article really interesting, it helps one to appreciate the fact that work isn't all about earning.its about caring for others and appreciating what they do and how they do it. I also appreciate the Multitasking approach of the Octopus Woman.

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  49. In as much as women are seen as a weaker vessel, its still obvious that women multi-task. However, in the society we are, women are seen as the back stagers while the men front in the society but the fact remains that behind every successful man is an energetic and intelligent woman

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  50. It is really nice seeing this article. Very thoughtful, I give it a superlike

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  51. A fascinating and brilliant piece worth reading by every manager.

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  52. Very good article which needs to be read by all managers.

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  53. Very good article,it shows many faces of a women in the 21st century.

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  54. I was one of those people who assumed that work is what you get paid for. Even if I am so passionate about caring for others, I thought I should be paid for that. As for household chores, for me that was not a job. So thank you for the article cause I now have clarity that people are fulfilled even by serving God as a job.

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  55. "When we work, we do more than earn a living, we also create, care for, and serve others. We hopefully derive some satisfaction, but also a deeper understanding of our own identities". I enjoy this approach.
    I think you should come to Romania too. There is a great need for changing mindsets.
    I always went to work and did my job with joy. The joy of doing something useful. The joy of a new day. The joy of meeting with co-workers. The joy of working.
    Everything until the day of management change. And with the change of management, everything became a burden. Work has become a prison. Unrecognisable.
    That was the point where I said, no! It's not possible this way! There are other options! And, there really is! :)

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  56. Thanks for the article. I can see how the image of the Octopus Woman can be interpreted differently. One as a woman who masters the task of multitasking, and the other where she is working too hard or taking on too much work. Nevertheless, the ultimately depicts a hard working woman.

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  57. Thanks for Regards.This article is very good And New Gain a knowledgeable. This article is Very important and Solve the My Question.

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  58. women that manage thrie homes with their children and husbands are not housewives. they are now termed as home makers as this cannot be done by everyone and with passage of time, home maker is also a category of job that not everyone can do.

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  59. Very Interesting Article...

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  60. I know many octopus women. I'd consider myself one.:)

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  61. I'm adding a new knowledge to my diary

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  62. Great concept of octopus women.
    A big thumbsup for this article!!

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  63. Very Interesting!! Specially concept of octopus women.Worth reading it.

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  64. Octopus human are we???? Yes , many times. Nice to know that caring is also an important work.

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  65. Indeed a great thought by you shared in this article. I am glad that I am able to read this, this is actually the ground reality which I as a woman can feel while working and really hope that things will change in a time and work will be accepted more with it's fundamental importance. I really appreciate the way you put it together in your words.
    Thank you very much.

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  66. Thank you for sharing this, you just highlighted something very important.

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  67. Wow.. ..
    yes indeed it is time truly embrace work's fundamental importance ...Thank you.. I really love this article

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  68. its very clear from the article that a women handling lot of responsibilities in search of living,in search of identity,in search of knowledge....the work which gives a pay for the hours spent on the task also gives self satisfaction a breathe of self discipline and realization of ones's own capabilities.Many people work for different reasons but to know the fundamental importance of it, is of utmost importance.Work may be official or informal you have t consider it with respect and rest will follow.Dignity,self respect comes all from the work you follow and practise years together.

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  69. Thanks for this article, it has broaden my understanding on work.

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  70. Very thoughtful work. Good work done.

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  71. very informative with educative values....perceptions were great....

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  72. this article is very essential to us not only to women but also to all the men because through this articles we came to know that as a women how she handles the various household work with care,joy and simile.

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  73. Very inspiring and informative things

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  74. This added new perspective to my mind, why ppl work, why they need other things then money? thought employee are permanent why org Give reward to them? Why worker help each other as this is not what they paid for....ya learn a lot
    I also make notes of all this and publish on my blog https://shantanu.shodkk.com

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  75. its really important to tell about the housewives whose difficulties were didn't unsunged from a long period

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  76. It is interesting knowing that caring and household shores are part of work.

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  77. This is an eye-opener. Household work done by the women are unpaid work and must be respected and cherished just like paid work. It is unpaid work that aims at caring for others and serving them. Thanks for this experience, Mr. Budd.

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  78. Excellent. Well written and clearer insight

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  79. Very thoughtful article.. but unfortunately people have to go to certain places like Mueseums or galleries to understand this .. after that also I doubt whether they learn to respect, appreciate their Mom,wife or elderely parents ,house keeping staff's who help us on day to day . Make us sucessful at our workplace where we head to take paycheques ..?? Unconditional effort ,care and love by family is always priceless for our sucess.

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  80. realy it was very usefull Thank you

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  81. One thing caught my attention the most "When we work, we do more than earn a living, we also create, care for, and serve others."

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  82. This is really an eye-opener. I have learnt that why work is seen as only a way of living is because some cultures have made it to be in that regards. Also, in a way, it is being passed on consciously or unconsciously
    to future generations.
    I believe this order should be changed. Work should also be seen as having to do with the realization of one's identity and a way of conducing to the betterment of humanity.
    Truly when jobs are just taken to be just about the monetary aspect, then super-monitoring which in itself is not productive, is ineluctable. We have to start looking beyond that.

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  83. Very good article. In our society and community, there is no identification of household work as a unpaid job. The household work carries much more values which is couldn't measure in term of money. Thanks sir

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  84. Thanks for the article. When we work,we do more than earn a living,we also created,care for serving others. I appreciate you for the knowledge.Thanks ones more.

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  85. This is a good article because when we work we as well earn a living to support our families. Thanks

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  86. great piece. it is high time the house hold work is recognized as work even if it gets unpaid.

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  87. This great article gives a broad knowledge thanks for sharing its really very motivating..

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  88. Thanks this article was great and sounds motivational

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  89. Thankyou this is so informative.

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  90. This is very nice information about this article thanks professor

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  91. Excellent article and very informative.

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  92. Totally agreed and this information is such a great masterpiece

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  93. Excellent article full of knowledge

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  94. Great article Professor, this has given me a more clearer understanding on why people work.

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  95. Totally agreed and excellent article full of knowledge

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  96. I genuinely loved the article as the actual meaning of work is.. doing something in favor of others without having personal agenda. Today, most of us work to achieve our own goals which is a necessity of course, but, being a volunteer for the society, is the true meaning of work, which increases our satisfaction level and inspire us to work more for them. It gives us the joy and make our work meaningful.

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  97. Amazing work should not be looked as something we do only because we need money. It should be more valued. I enjoy this article.

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  98. Honestly you show case a reality that is never rewarded by some clime.
    I am deeply touched.
    Greater you.

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  99. Fully enjoyed this as it gives me a different perspective

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  100. I like the definition of work that does not only mean making a living bu also to care and serve others. Thank you very much.

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  101. really true, must accept and treat those work is also work without pay and really contributing to family and society. nice article. thank you

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  102. The Octopus woman depicts most of the ladies and their capabilities. The art of multitasking and a number of responsibilities.

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  103. the women depicts the valuable and competencies.

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  104. I relate majorly with the octopus woman, the society already assume so many responsibilities to the woman, so many expectations and in this present world women also want to get fulfilment outside the home by working,still all this seems to be nothing.

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  105. It is interesting and useful knowing that caring and household shores are part of work.

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  106. Thanks for the article. In Hindu religion women are worshipped in form of Goddess Durga (ten hands), Goddess Lakshmi (eight hands) and many more which establishes the fact that from ancient times the society recognized the contribution of women and respected the variety of work they have to perform which is essential for a family, community and a society to grow and flourish.

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  107. apart from making money or earning a living which is through but myopic, work should seen as service whether to God or to Humanity. It is the willingness to exercise one body, soul, mind and spirit and intellectual ability to help oneself or others.

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  108. Thanks allot, this article is very motivational.

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  109. Thanks alot for this article,this was very important and motivating

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  110. This article is full of wisdom. I'm in fact learning a lot of things from the around the world.

    Thank you so much, Sir!

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  111. Excellent reading. As we say in Mexico: work dignify. It is not only about money, as you said, involves many other things; because when you see the work solely for the money is when you get frustrated.

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  112. Work has always been multifaceted, we are slowly making progress in recognizing the different types of work that contribute to our society, but still a way to go.

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  113. We are slowly recognizing that work is multifaceted here in the US. Still a way to go, but inching towards progress.

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  114. Thanks for this article, it further helped me understand that work isn't just about money but also about creating, caring and serving others

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  115. Good. Now both men and women are paying equal in organizational because of the same tasks assign to them.

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  116. Great article helps me to understand a lot

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  117. Learned A lot of from this article. Great written.

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  118. Having 8 hands (Octopus worker) is a super description for people who workers who go beyond their job descriptions. Yes, house wives could be an example of the above. Not only women, we do have men too who wish if they had 8 hands... you are employed some where, you go to work every morning and return home to take up the domestic chores, prepare tea for yourself, mop the house while supper is on fire, wash the garments so that you don't pile them for a weekend, plan for the following day's tasks at the job place... don't you realy think 8 hands are needed and may be 4 heads....

    Work is inevitable and no amount of money can pay what one does in a day whether at the formal employment, informal or domestic.

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  119. Love this article and the metaphor of the octopus lady. For too long now women have struggled with being professionals or being domestic housewives. To some extent we've figured a way to juggle both worlds but we are still grossly underpaid and under appreciated. Work for many is monetary but there is a bigger scope to work and that's identity and caring for others. Women are nurturers by nature so our ability to care for our families and our work families is no surprise. We just want to be compensated fairly for our juggling experience.

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  120. Thank you for this depiction of a woman multi-tasking. Hoepfully, we all can appreciate and compensate all genders for their time and efforts.

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  121. Thankyou fo such a lovely article it is more beneficial towards women's development

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  122. This article is very thoughtful. I come from a background where work done by women at home is not valued at so many different levels. Only if you have a job that gives you a steady income, you are respected else you are looked at as someone who is living under the expenses of others. Even though these thoughts are shifting among few people with education and changing times, there is still a paradigm change needed here where both women and men should be seen as equal contributors to the society.

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  123. I enjoyed the article. Well done! I love that work done in the home is getting the credit that it deserves. I think it is often that men in this society (and women to a lesser extent) do not value the household work that is done by their partner or other individuals. We put so much emphasis on the person making income from outside work that we tend to forget that the person at home is doing work that is also valuable. I was a stay-at-home dad for many years, I feel I have a different kind of perspective than many other males.

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  124. I firmly believe that the work of women in and within the home is a key and important piece and whose role leads us to the fact that it is now time to change the retrograde and excessive point of view in thinking at the time of its devaluation. 1. The Woman when taking charge of her home, the domestic tasks and the care of the offspring, this implies that in her hands is the continuous gear of the world in terms of social, moral and economic, she is: Guide, educator of all moral aspects, principles and fundamentals towards respect within what is understood as the norms, rules and laws. 2. Example, her daily life in the face of the offspring is a continued example where courage, strength, control and providing psychic and emotional solutions are contemplated that contribute stability to the issues that the offspring present to her. 3. Wife, she considers willing and always values ​​her cleaning tasks, daily food, shopping for medical appointments, emergencies, etc., and personal and family care are always done. And this is every day, he does not have vacations, he does not have entry or exit schedules, if this is to work, not a job, to work without rights or salary assignment, and if we add to this also working outside the home then we find ourselves without a doubt to a "MUST BE A CHANGE" and if others come to do motivated to cover these jobs, they must enjoy rights and changes in their contracts, although at the end of the day we will always be in front of a group that will inevitably continue to have to attend two jobs at the same time outside and inside the home, I totally believe that those women or men who do work outside and inside the home deserve to be encouraged by governments to recognize that without these hard-working women the world would be limited, not to say hopelessly with fate of disorder and no hope of a job secession in the future. The people who are preparing to provide a care service should enjoy certain merits and rights that must be remunerated in a considerate way, since they are like, for example, a table that is missing a leg and the woman is who. She holds her but when she cannot be, she must find a wedge that fills that table to keep her in balance while she is not there, the work should not be seen as a mere monetary sign, whatever it is, perhaps organizations should implement somewhat more standards. Considered as to how our work, regardless of what it is, contributes something to others, that it is necessary for the worker to be there, that they really appreciate developing it and that such implication merits not only monetary but also a gratification in the fact of having been useful for others In this, I would point to the discovery of who we are, identity and to see in conclusion the work as a service that in the end does not end because there is always someone you need from others.

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  125. Thank you Prof for bringing in these 2 images to teach excellent lessons about work. The Octopus woman can achieve everything she desires and wants with her eight hands both inside and outside her home. She only needs all the support from the community and society especially mentally, emotionally and socially to get going. God has created women strong to shoulder that.

    Managers should stop looking at work as a clipboard with a built-in stopwatch to monitor, supervise, and incentivize employees in order to break work down into simple, repetitive, mindless tasks. This micromanaging of employees kills innovation, teamwork, and other values at work.

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  126. Very informative.. Thanks for this article....

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  127. Thank you sir it is informative for us.

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  128. each society has its tradition , and every point of view are valued , there is no fair in recent way image regarding women's work from all respects

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  129. understandble and excellent lesson about work

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  130. Yes
    At work, there is an important aspect of human responsibility that should not be overlooked

    Thank you

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  131. Well said. Work is not one way,it comes in various way such as volunteers works, identity work, work for pay.etc. any work you do should bring fulfilment and also achievements where necessary, it should be compensated

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  132. I am really grateful to have to read this today, because it seems like i am just focusing in just one way in which you can see the work, earn money and it can be much more than that.

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  133. Work is a enclosed,easy and simple only to myopic people. Work is a broad and extensive phenomenon,the more involved the more your knowledge about it.
    This article has done Justice to my inquisitiveness.

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  134. This was a masterpiece example behind which we can learn so many things

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  135. This was a great article for me to read, not only because as a woman I am upset with gender inequality in the workplace, but it reinforces my belief that this is a societal problem that has negative consequences for all, not just women. Whether work is paid or unpaid, in the home or out, it needs to be respected and valued. If it isn't, it demotivates the individuals serving in these (important) roles which decreases job satisfaction and can lessen the quality of work. It also places a stigma that would dissuade individuals with skills/abilities from pursuing stereotyped occupations (i.e. possible feelings of embarrassment or insufficient pay) even though a job may actually be their true "calling".

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  136. Great article. Women should be paid equal to their male counterparts for the same job. A womans job is never 8 hrs. It is 24/7.

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  137. women are more resistant than men it is known why a difference in salary must be equal

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  138. This article is powerful, it's potent gives the perfect reason why women should not be judge as a weakling.

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  139. Not to detract from the import of the metaphor, but given more than eight hands, it's still not enough for women to adequately manage the non–monetary domestic care work they do.

    It's equally appalling that society has always, always down through history been misogynic in the way we underestimate the care duties of women in keeping the domestic church functional.

    Therefore, I would like to think that the reason their contribution is classified non–monetary is because it cannot be quantified in monetary terms: no amount of money amount of money can adequately pay for it.

    It's high time appropriate policies are put in place to change the narrative.

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